Immunoglobulin | Light Organ, Vibraphone, Gongs

Student Performance OSA Chamber Orch Feb 2018, Berkeley, CA

 

Let Vibrate for Prepared Bass Drum, Electronics, and Piano (2015)

36"X28"

24"X24"

40"X36"

 

L.V. is a notation device informing the performer not to dampen a sound after it's initial attack; instead, it should die away naturally.

Let Vibrate for Prepared Bass Drum, Electronics, and Piano (2015 - )

36"X28"

24"X24"

40"X36"

 

L.V. is a notation device informing the performer not to dampen a sound after it's initial attack; instead, it should die away naturally.

Facsimile for Piano (2014)

Hand Bound Artist Book

 

3D Score

Nick Kanozik 2012

Cello – Crystal Pasccuci / Tenor Sax – Joshua Marshall / Percussion – Lydia Martin / Piano – Nick Kanozik (Dimensions 25x10x10ins)

This Structure extends the idea to explore space in notation. This object’s form is constructed with two main ideas, the first being the structural component which utilizes three 140lb bristle paper that dictates information to be performed by percussive instruments (snare with brushes and piano). The second aspect is the content of the structure, colored thread, to be read at a rate of five seconds per inch. The thread tells the musicians how loud to play based off the width of the thread, what pitch to play based off the color, and when to play based on the surrounding structural elements.

The Choloric  5.75”x4.4”x1”

Hand crafted artist book with embedded contact microphone.

 

Made with watercolor | India ink | papyrus | 140lb. watercolor paper | tracing paper | light gel.

The Phlegmatic 
5”x3”x2.5”

Synthesizor Book

Created by Nick Kanozik and Nick Wang

 

Presented at a "Sonically Minded Book" lecture at Mills College. The circuit uses two 555 oscillators and a single transistor vca. The two oscillators are built using 555 timer ic's with photoresistors added to add an element of light sensitivity to the oscillators' respective pitch content and switching rate. the r-c low pass filter before the output also uses a photoresistor to further alter the light sensitivity of the electronics. when building the circuit, I wanted to ensure a good variety of behaviors given different ambient light conditions.

The Melancholic 
4.5”x4.5”x1.3”

Hand crafted artist book with embedded contact microphone. Sewn in 56 signatures with paper and paper-like materials: photo paper | museum board | light gel | tracing paper | transparency paper | aluminum foil | watercolor paper of various weights | etc. | ceramic tile (back) | upholstery (cover)

The second movement of Reichlich highlights the titles' etymological derivative through it's notation and inspiration: From Greek anthos “a flower” and suffix logia meaning “collection” or “collecting” (from legein “gather”). This piece includes intuitive sonic renderings of five specific flowers determined by the quantity of prominent parts (form and instrumentation), coloration of these particular parts (pitch), size of each of the flower heads (dynamics), and textural qualities of petals and leaves (timbre). The flower specimens are notated for conductor, three cellos, two double bass, glockenspiel, vibraphone and four cymbals and are performed in a set order: Alan Fradd (Cistus × purpureus), Regal Geranium (Pelargonium domesticum), African Daisy (Arctotis acaulis), Devil in the Bush (Nigella damascene), and Lily of the Nile (Zantedeschia aethiopica). The conductor prepares performers for each of the flower sonorities by turning a page in a large prop book and cues the string players to begin with a sonic cue on cymbal, piano, or zither.

GLIPH study is a theoretical exercise. Duration-color is based on Johannes Itten's physiological ratios of complementary consonance. Pith-color is derived from intuitive processes of light (higher in pitch) and dark hues (lower in pitch) on a scale of seven octaves. These parameters in combination isolate consonance/dissonance observations of range in GLIPH study: First Plane for a variety of timbres.

-Second plane: All Instruments-

The Second plane of this study adds black (drum) and white (cymbal) as percussive triggers and a visual third dimension enacting an additional, indeterminate, sonic parameter. The 3-dimensional notation in this plane allows performers to consider sonic realizations of solid objects.